Monday, May 7, 2007

CROSSING BORNEO BORDERS

THE LEGAL ENTRY FROM KALIMANTAN INTO SARAWAK

Location: Entikong (Sanggau District, West Kalimantan) & Tebedu (Kuching Division, Sarawak)
Date: March, 2007




The official border checkpoints at Entikong (West Kalimantan) and Tebedu (Sarawak) opens daily at 5 AM (or 6 AM Eastern Malaysian time. Officially opened in 1991, it is Indonesia's first regulated landborder crossing point - with at least 8 transnational buses commuting daily between Pontianak and Kuching.






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THE SOMEWHAT LEGAL ENTRY FROM KALIMANTAN INTO SARAWAK

Location: 15 kilometers outside Lubok Antu, Sri Aman Division, Sarawak
Date: March, 2003





A police checkpoint outside the bordertown of Lubok Antu (Sarawak). When this photo was taken (early 2003), access into Sarawak was only granted to those Indonesian borderlanders possessing the 'Pas Lintas Batas/PLB' (borderpasses). As PLB access into Sarawak was limited to visits within the perimeter border of the Lubok Antu sub-district (Daerah Kecil) area, police checkpoints like these were setup to prevent 'illegal' breaches of the perimeter.

For timber logs it's a different story. Log exports from West Kalimantan to Lubok Antu are officially banned by the Indonesian government, but smuggled timber enjoys immediate legalization once processed by Lubok Antu sawmills. Another task of the police here is to confirm the timber's virtual 'legality'.

A perfect illustration of globalisation's real intentions: shackle humans, liberate commodities.











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THE OLD 'HIGHWAYS' INTO SARAWAK

Location: The borderlands between Sarawak's Kapit Division & East Kalimantan's Malinau District.
Date: February 2003




This is the traditional route through which the Kenyah Dayaks of the Apokayan highlands in East Kalimantan, one of Indonesia's most isolated regions, go on their daily shopping sprees to logging camps inside Sarawak. Pictured here (center below) is a Kenyah family resting on the exact (but unmarked and unguarded) Malaysian - Indonesian boundary.






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1 Comments:

Blogger James Yong said...

I enjoy your blog about the inner reaches of Borneo. I was born in Miri, Sarawak, and spent my youth in Kuching. Now I reside mainly in Singapore although I still have strong ties and interest in the history & development of my home state.

February 1, 2009 at 9:32 AM  

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